Article Review: Unexpected Benefits of Return on Investment Analysis

This article was originally reviewed for my statistics and research methods class. Pan, D., Wiersma, G., Williams, L., & Fong, Y. S. (2013). More than a number: unexpected benefits of return on investment analysis. Journal of Academic Librarianship, 39(6), 566-572. Since the crash of 2008, libraries (along with everyone else) have struggled to provide more resources with less funding, frequently under close scrutiny from administrators and other higher-ups who want to make sure that the money being spent is having … Read More

Article Review: Computer Assisted Instruction versus Bibliographic Instruction

This article was originally reviewed for my statistics and research methods course. Van Scoyoc, A. M. (2003). Reducing library anxiety in first-year students: The impact of computer-assisted instruction and bibliographic instruction. Reference and User Services Quarterly, 42(4), 329-341 The purpose of this study was very straightforward. The author notes that “library anxiety” is a common issue among undergraduate students and that it can affect their ability to be sucessful in their coursework. Traditionally, this anxiety has been mitigated by bibliographic … Read More

Article Review: Facebook use in libraries

This article was originally reviewed for my statistics and research methods class. Aharony, N. (2012). Facebook use in libraries: An exploratory analysis. Aslib Proceedings, 64(4), 358-372. The purpose of this study was to examine differences in how libraries use Facebook as a an outreach tool. The study focused on American libraries, and sampled the Facebook pages of a small set of public and academic libraries. While I found this article to be interesting in that it addresses what is clearly … Read More

Article review: Visualization Tools for Atlas Collection Assessment

This article was originally reviewed for my statistics and research methods class. Lowery, R. (2011). A Visualization Tool for Atlas Collection Assessment. Journal of Map & Geography Libraries: Advances in Geospatial Information, Collections & Archives, 7:2, 138-153. This article examines the use of visualization tools in collection assessment, particularly for hard-to-assess and non-circulating materials such as atlases. The author examines the University of Illinois Chicago collection of geographic materials to determine their range and depth, as well as look for … Read More

Article review: Overlap between faculty citations and library collections

This article was originally reviewed for my statistics and research methods course. Kellsey, C. & Knievel, J. (2012). Overlap between humanities faculty citation and library monograph collections, 2004-2009. College & Research Libraries, 73(6), 569-583. The purpose of this study was to determine whether library collections are meeting the needs of faculty members, as assessed by citation analysis of books published by authors in four humanities departments. The researchers were also interested in investigating several related research questions: How old are … Read More

Article Review: Controversial books in the public library

This article was originally reviewed for my course on research and statistical methods. Spence, A. (2000). Controversial books in the public library: A comparative survey of holdings of gay-related children’s picture books. Library Quarterly, 70(3), 335-379. This study used electronic library catalogs from American and Canadian public libraries (although some libraries in New Zealand, Britain, and Australia were also examined) to do a comparative survey of libraries’ holdings of controversial books; specifically ‘gay-related’ books for children. Spence’s study was very … Read More

Article Review: Chat reference communication patterns and implications

This article was originally reviewed for my course on research and statistical methods. Westbrook, L. (2007). Chat reference communication patterns and implications: Applying politeness theory. Journal of Documentation, 63(5), 638-658. This study examined the reference chat records of a university library over the course of the academic year to determine how users and librarians interacted, particularly in regards to markers of formality and informality. The author considered the results in relation to politeness theory, which stresses the concepts of face-threat … Read More

Article Review: Imposed Queries in the Public Library

This article was originally reviewed for my statistics and research methods class. Gross, M. & Saxton, M. L. (2001). Who wants to know? Imposed queries in the public library. Public Libraries, 40(3), 170-176. Gross and Saxton conducted a survey of reference inquiries in order to determine what percentage of reference transactions are “imposed queries” – questions in which the person seeking the reference services is doing so on behalf of someone else (a family member, employer, social group, etc.). The … Read More

Tenure for Librarians

The question of tenure is a convoluted one, especially when applied to librarians. “Faculty status,” as it is referred to at some institutions, raises strong opinions in those who are both for an against it. In 1973, the Commission on Academic Tenure in Higher Education published a report on the subject, weighing the pros and cons of academic tenure; they reference a statement from the 1940s by the American Association of University Professors describing the necessity for faculty to have … Read More

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